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20121027
20121104
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WMPT (PBS) 9
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
old and is a pet owner may lean democrat and be susceptible to ads about education issues. thanks to these algorithms, the campaigns can categorize voters into like-minded groups and tailor their advertising directly to them. >> what this now shows is when you've done a select of voters in a particular jurisdiction, it will map out where those voters live. >> reporter: which means once the campaigns have used algorithms to decide which voters to target, they lose i have been pet-owning, wash d.c. d.c. nascar fans who care about national security, for instance, the software can lead them right to their front door. >> so a campaign can literally know who on a block-by-block basis is persuadable and only target those people. >> that's correct. reporter: but what makes this year's presidential election different is that political advertisers now have unprecedented access to your on-line browsing data and can deliver tailored ads to you online. >> so the idea here with online is that you can target people very precisely based upon their interests and based upon th the behavior. when yo
to the foreign drug -- attractions to the foreign drug companies. there are educated, english-speaking doctors, and a vast population from which to choose trial subjects, all of whom are required under indian law to give their informed consent. >> i put my thumbprint on the document and my daughter-in-law signed in hindi, but the form was in english, so we couldn't understand everything. >> but that was enough for a 3-day-old healthy boy to be given a trial polio vaccine. he had a severe adverse event which was recorded by the hospital. four days later his family says he still has breathing and eating problems. this baby is more than one of 80 patients who the records show was severely affected in the trials in this town, most of which took place here at the main hospital. the families of the dozens who died might have never known their loved ones were ever on a trial, were it not for a doctor here at the hospital who turned whistleblower. >> the clinical trial subjects don't know the meaning of clinical trials. these doctors, they are making money and they are making huge amounts from the pha
and a colleague of the late u.s. commissioner of education ernest boyer. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> kathleen, the last time you were here you said all we've got left in the search for truth and knowledge is the debate. all right, are you satisfied now? >> no, we did not get an answer to the question that i wanted answered, which is "what are the sacrifices you're going to ask of us? where are you going to get the money that we need in a way that won't tank the economy, that will increase the likelihood of economic growth?" and so, the problem now facing the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to the wire. and that's what we got. one won one, ano
leadership, and this week that's what lou has been thinking about, authenticity. here is author and educator, lou heckler. >> on a recent trip, my wife and i attended a church service where the sermon was about authenticity. it got me thinking about the best boss i ever had. this gentleman had that rare ability to be squarely in charge and yet make you feel like he always had your back. he demanded much of those of us working for him and was equally generous with rewards for a job well done. if you made an error he was concerned but forgiving and particularly focused on the lessons you learned. better still, we all knew this wasn't just what he did, it was who he was. howard schultz, founder of starbucks says it this way: authentic brands don't emerge from marketing cubicles or advertising agencies. they emanate from everything the company does. if you have customers or employees, how would they rate your company's authenticity? the old phrase "fake it until you make it" may work in some situations, but not in this arena. i'm lou heckler. >> tom: finally, like millions of americans in the pa
, the environment has never ranked particularly highly compared to the economy and opportunities in education and defense and crime and things like that. but that's been declining over time. in fact, you unpack the environment section of what people care about, climate tends to rank virtually dead last. people are more concerned with their local environment: air pollution, water pollution, things like that. this is why we've seen these new poll-tested terms like "carbon pollution." c.o.-2 is the thing i'm exiling at you right now, we breathe out carbon dioxide. so we're seeing new terms called green energy instead of climate change because polls show people are skeptical and dubious of those motivations. they believe it's been overblown and it turns people off. >> suarez: joseph romm, why haven't we heard more about this topic during the national campaign? >> well, of course, mitt romney gets money from fossil fuel interests that's one reason he even opposes a clean energy tax credit for wind. obama, i think, is just misreading the polls entirely. the latest polling shows that -- i think ken
. they have a lot of things to worry about. but they need to educate themselveses on this issue because it's not getting fixed. the tragedy of this prior to the crisis, there are a few simple things that could have been done that could have prevented this. we should have raised bank capital requirements, constrained the amount of large financial institutions to use borrowed money to fund themselves. instead regulators were allowing financial institutions to take on more leverege. >> rose: what about glass-steagle. >> the glass-steagle issue is now an issue because of the bailouts and all the consolidation. it wasn't so much a driver of the crisis but it's an issue now. i think this is a real problem and i see insured deposits funding more and more, really high-risk activity, and that high-risk activity may have economic worth but i don't want the government funding it with insured deposits. >> rose: you want insured deposits only for banks it involved in traditional-- >> lending, derivatives, security tradings, market making should be out of banks-- take deposits, make loans. >> rose: can
most severe threat to survival. what about someone who never got a college education-who failed in business-who was an ally of a thoroughly corrupt political machine? well, history has been pretty kind to harry truman, whose post-war leadership put europe back on its feet, and who combined strength and judgment. and was it really likely that an ex-actor, who launched his political career with a speech on behalf of one of the most unsuccessful candidates in history, would win two landslide victories and remain as the single most revered figure in his party? even some liberal historians now give ronald reagan high marks for helping to end the cold war. and it's not as though we know what experience will best serve in the oval office. no one knew the congress better than lyndon johnson. he'd spent his life there. but johnson saw the world through that prism. he could not comprehend, for instance, that north vietnam's leaders did not want a hydroelectric dam-they wanted a country, and would fight for it as long as it took to win. do you look for early clues? franklin roosevelt's rel
on education reform because he answers to his political supporters it was familiar arguments but phrased more beautifully. will it swing votes at this late date, sort of dubious. but there have been occasions when votes have shifted in the last few days. i think the dui story which hit george w. bush in 2000, i think that did shift. but it takes something sort of extraordinary. >> the thing i think that will stand out after if we hadn't had sandy would be the story of the week is the really shameless ad that the romney people put on in ohio that chrysler was going to ship its production overseas to china. by the fact that chrysler has already committed $500 million of creation of production in toledo and 1100 new jobs there. but it was just, it was really scaring people, you know, that somehow the president had been part of bailing out chrysler and gm and ordered to ship those jobs, and the production overseas to china. that was shall did -- and he got attacked by the republican papers in the state including the youngstown vindicater being indefensible. and i just think it had to be the produ
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)